Menu

Graduate Course Descriptions

 

All courses, unless otherwise noted, are three credit hours. Graduate course numbers range from 500 to 799. Courses at the 500 level are generally graduate-level basic core curriculum courses, while courses in the 600s and 700s are generally either upper-level required courses or electives.

AMP 500 APPLIED MINISTRY PROJECT Required every semester

A practical application of Christian ministry in diverse areas, such as discipleship, Christian counseling, Bible study leadership, chaplaincy, street evangelism, hospital visitation, etc. A position of ministry in a local church will satisfy this requirement if approved by the Director of Applied Ministry. This is a required non-academic credit course for all full-time students taking 9 or more credit hours.

BIB 501 BIBLE INTRODUCTION

An advanced introduction that emphasizes the nature, historical background, linguistics, canonization, transmission of the text, and English translations of the Bible.

CPL 500 CHAPEL Required every semester

As a vital component of a Christ-centered education, Criswell College embraces chapel worship to encourage a community of learning and faith. Chapel supports the educational curriculum of the campus community through weekly collective meetings as a campus family, exposing students to quality models of expository preaching and sound biblical teaching, an enacted theology of worship, and a model of good corporate worship. This is a required non-academic credit course for all full-time students taking 9 or more credit hours.

CSL 505 COUNSELING THEORIES

Introduces students to theories of counseling from a historical, chronological, and theological perspective. The psychoanalytic, Adlerian, person-centered, humanistic-existential, cognitive-behavioral theories of counseling are identifies and analyzed. Students examine each theory in light of their personal Christian worldview.  

CSL 510 SOCIAL, CULTURAL AND FAMILY ISSUES

Students investigate attitudes and perspectives regarding gender, race, ethnicity, sexual orientation, age, and other cultural differences. Particular emphasis will be placed upon biblical, historical, and cultural perspectives and the impact current views have on the counseling relationship. Students are encouraged to expand their points of view of diverse populations leading toward successful therapeutic relationships.

CSL 515 COUNSELING METHODS AND TECHNIQUES

A study of selected methods and techniques of counseling as they apply to normal and abnormal human behavior in order to aid students in identification of a preferred counseling theory based on their understanding of selected theories and self-understanding of personal values, beliefs, and personality.

In addition, students are challenged to integrate their Christian worldview as it impacts the counselor and counseling relationships. (Prerequisite: CSL 505)

CSL 520 HUMAN GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT

A broad overview of perspectives, principles, theories, and research findings associated with the field of human life span development. Providing a foundation of knowledge that will help students become more effective practitioners through a greater knowledge of how people develop over the course of their lifespan. Students also gain a perspective of how Christians develop and grow over the course of their spiritual lives.

CSL 525 ABNORMAL HUMAN BEHAVIOR

A study of psychopathology to aid students in understanding problems outside the normal range of behavior. Students develop skills in making diagnoses according to the DSM-IV and grow in their understanding of the various treatments of abnormal behavior. Students examine the interaction between the Christian worldview and abnormal human behavior and treatment.

CSL 530 LIFESTYLE AND CAREER DEVELOPMENT

An investigation of the concept of career, providing an overview of the career development field and the practice of career guidance. Students identify and analyze theories of career development relevant to American culture including strategies, assessments, and various resources to assist with career decisions. Students examine the concept of career as a process that continues throughout the life span in light of God’s purpose and plan.

CSL 601 APPRAISAL AND ASSESSMENT TECHNIQUES

An examination of the basic principles and methods of individual assessment in counseling psychology. Addresses mental health exams, scoring, and interpretation of standardized assessment measures. Special issues include ethical considerations, social-cultural implications, and the use of testing and assessment methods within the context of a local church.

CSL 605 RESEARCH

Designed to assist the student in becoming a critical consumer of research through learning to conduct an integrative review of the literature on various topics in counseling. Students are challenged to think critically and form research questions to evaluate the growing body of literature in the areas of counseling and psychology. In addition, students are required to consider research, statistics, and assessment techniques to be utilized within the context of the local church body.

CSL 610 TOPICS IN COUNSELING

A course treating any number of specific issues pertaining to psychology, sociology, and spirituality as it relates to the counseling profession. This course may be repeated for credit when the topic of study differs.

CSL 615 GROUP

A study of current theories and techniques in group therapy, including dynamics of interpersonal relationship and the social, diagnostic, and other factors that impact group psychotherapy. Dynamics of interpersonal relationships and groups within the context of the church are also examined.

CSL 620 PROFESSIONAL ORIENTATION/PRE-PRACTICUM

An introduction to biblical responsibility in counseling, the myriad of ethical issues that surface in counseling settings, and legal requirements of counselors. Topics include privacy and confidentiality, duty to warn, abuse reporting procedures, licensure and certification, marketing, boundaries in therapeutic relationships, and counselor health and welfare. Students are required to perform informal interviews to demonstrate practical counseling skills.

CSL 630 PRACTICUM I

In order to be eligible for this course, students must have the approval of the department chair, be in good academic standing, completed all degree prerequisites, and be in the final 12 hours toward M.A. Counseling degree completion. Designed to provide supervised practical counseling experience from a Christian perspective that can be applied in a ministry, school, agency, or college setting. Students learn the basics of active listening skills and appropriate counseling techniques through role-play and supervised counseling experience. Students must have three to five actual tape-recorded sessions and acquire 150 hours of indirect and direct counseling experience at an approved site. Practicum students will meet with the professor every week. Interview summaries, detailed analyses, and other relevant counseling experiences are a part of the course. Orientation to the role of the professional counselor and ethical concerns are re-addressed. (Practicum I and II must be taken during a student’s last year of enrollment.)

CSL 640 PRACTICUM II

A continuation of CSL 630. Students apply knowledge and skills in a face-to-face relationship gained from previous course work in their degree program. Students work under the supervision of a field counselor with accountability to the professor of record. A professional portfolio is prepared that reflects field experiences integrated with course content and research. A minimum of 150 field experience clock hours is required, averaging about 8 hours per week, during the course of the semester. Faculty counseling program professors visit students at their assigned school at least twice during each semester. (Practicum I and II must be taken during a student’s last year of enrollment.)

EDU 501 EDUCATIONAL MINISTRY IN THE CHURCH

An advanced introduction to the various aspects of the educational ministry of the local church. The educational mandates of the New Testament are applied to the organizational life of the church. Attention is given to goals, principles, and leadership required for the educational process. The student is made aware of various curricula for current Christian education.

EDU 532 PRINCIPLES OF TEACHING

An advanced study of principles and methods of effective Christian teaching. Emphasis is placed on developing teaching plans with an opportunity teach. Approaches include teaching for knowledge, understanding, attitude change, Christian growth, and application.

EDU 601 EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY

An analysis of major educational theories made in the context of Christian education. Major emphases include personality and cognitive development, theories of learning, instructional objectives, motivation, and the educational psychology of Jesus.

EDU 610 ORGANIZATIONAL MANAGEMENT

An advanced course focused on understanding the purposes, processes, and problems involved in organizational administration, including the area of Christian education. Areas of study include budgeting, scheduling, staff management, committee structure and leadership, and facilities, encouraging a Christian concept of stewardship.

EDU 615 CONFLICT MANAGEMENT

An analysis of the causes of conflict both at the interpersonal and institutional levels. Particular attention is given to models of communication and the constructive role of conflict managed correctly. In addition to case studies, students explore their own inclinations in the environment of conflict.

EMS 501 PERSONAL EVANGELISM

Research in the principles of effective evangelism. Attention is given to the biblical foundation and mandate to evangelize, personal spiritual preparation for the task, problems encountered in witnessing, the role of prayer and the Holy Spirit in evangelizing, and methods of follow-up and discipleship for the convert. (Prerequisite: THS 504)

EMS 502 CHURCH GROWTH

An analysis of the theological foundations for church growth in order to critique the church growth movement and benefit from its history. Principles of church growth theory are evaluated and applied to specific field situations. Strategies for targeting community needs and integrating converts into the life of the church are studied. (See also CPR 402; Prerequisite: EMS 501)

EMS 510 EVANGELISM IN THE BOOK OF ACTS

The main thrust of the Book of Acts is the expansion of the church by the spreading of the good news throughout the ancient world. This verse-by-verse study, focusing on evangelism, rekindles in the student the excitement, enthusiasm, and boldness exemplified by the first Christians. It also reveals principles that can be utilized in the twenty-first century church. (See also CPR 410)

EMS 515 EVANGELISM AND THE KINGDOM OF GOD

A careful analysis of the central evangelistic message preached by Jesus and the apostles. While theologians and New Testament scholars have adequately studied the Kingdom of God, it has been virtually ignored by evangelists. Students examine the Old Testament concept of the Kingdom, how it was interpreted by Jesus, applied to His listeners, and its relevance for today.

EMS 550 HISTORY AND THEOLOGY OF MISSIONS

An advanced study and analysis of major missiological motifs. An examination of the biblical foundation for missions, theological ramifications of crosscultural communication of the Gospel, strategies for applied missiology, and the historical expansion of Christian missions. The historical survey highlights the modern mission era and draws attention to trends shaping missionary activity in the twenty-first century. (Prerequisite: EMS 501)

EMS 602 CHURCH PLANTING

An advanced course analyzing topics related to church planting in North America and cross-culturally. Factors which inhibit and enhance successful church planting are identified and applied. Particular attention is given to gathering and using statistical data to identify such factors. (Prerequisite: EMS 501)  

EMS 611 EVANGELISM PRACTICUM

An approved practical evangelistic project. Designed to offer students extensive supervised experience in a specific field of evangelism.

EMS 625 MODERN REVIVAL AND AWAKENINGS

A study of major spiritual awakenings in the twentieth century and beyond. Attention will be given to the Welsh Revival, Azusa Street Revival, ministries of Billy Sunday, Aimee Semple McPherson, and Billy Graham, the rise of evangelicalism, healing revivals of the late 1940s, the Asbury Revival, the Jesus Movement, and the Charismatic Movement. Differences between genuine and pseudo-revivals are discussed.

EMS 710 CONTEMPORARY ISSUES IN EVANGELISM

A thorough examination of a current issue in evangelism. Topics include apologetics, evangelism in a pluralistic society, reaching the postmodernist with the Gospel, Jewish evangelism, and other contemporary and pertinent issues.

GRK 501 GREEK I

An advanced introduction to the basic Greek grammar in the New Testament.

GRK 502 GREEK II

A study of the elements of New Testament Greek with an emphasis on grammar and syntax from selected readings in the Johannine literature. (Prerequisite: GRK 501 or equivalent)

GRK 610 GREEK READING

An examination of the elements of New Testament Greek I and II with an emphasis on the rapid reading and advanced exegesis of the Greek text from selected Greek New Testament books and related Hellenistic texts. (Prerequisite: GRK 502 or equivalent)

GRK 620 GREEK EXEGETICAL SYNTAX I

A study of Greek grammar, emphasizing exegetical method in the Greek New Testament. Special attention given to syntax, textual criticism, literary analysis, and lexical studies. (Prerequisite: GRK 502 or equivalent)

GRK 630 GREEK EXEGETICAL SYNTAX II

A study of the traditional descriptive grammatical heritage of Robertson, Blass-Debrunner, Moulton, Turner, Howard, et al. Introduces the case grammar of T. H. Mueller, generative-transformational models, as well as a distinctly semantically-based theoretical orientation to the Greek New Testament. Expository-hortatory texts of advanced difficulty (e.g. 1 Peter, Lukan narrative, and Hebrews) provide the textual data to achieve the lexical, grammatical, semantical, and practical exegetical objectives. (Prerequisite: GRK 620 or equivalent)

HEB 501 HEBREW I

An introduction to the elements of biblical Hebrew with an emphasis on phonology, grammar, and vocabulary.

HEB 502 HEBREW II

A study of the elements of biblical Hebrew with an emphasis on grammar and syntax, with selected readings from the Hebrew Old Testament. (Prerequisite: HEB 501 or equivalent)

HEB 610 HEBREW READING

A continuation of the elements of Old Testament Hebrew I and II with an emphasis on rapid reading and advanced exegesis of the Hebrew text from selected Hebrew Old Testament Books. (Prerequisite: HEB 502 or equivalent)

HEB 620 HEBREW EXEGETICAL METHOD I

A study of Hebrew grammar, emphasizing exegetical method in Hebrew prose literature. Special attention given to syntax, textual criticism, literary analysis, and lexical studies. (Prerequisite: HEB 502 or equivalent)

HEB 630 HEBREW EXEGETICAL METHOD II

An advanced study of Hebrew grammar and syntax, with special attention given to the exegesis and exposition of Old Testament poetic texts. Topics include the interpretation of figurative language, parallelism, and meter in the exegesis of poetic texts. (Prerequisite: HEB 620)

JMS 500 INTRODUCTION TO BIBLICAL ARCHAEOLOGY

An advanced introduction to the contributions archaeology has made to the field of biblical interpretation. Includes a study of basic geography of Israel, an examination of some of the major archaeological sites in the Middle East, and a review of basic techniques used in the field of archaeology.

JMS 502 INTRODUCTION TO JEWISH STUDIES

An advanced study establishing a biblical rationale for Jewish evangelism. Examines the history, culture, and religious thought of the Jewish people with a view to better understand them, be able to evaluate past Christian efforts in Jewish evangelism, and to formulate strategies for effectively communicating the gospel in a Jewish context.

JMS 505 HISTORY AND GEOGRAPHY OF ISRAEL

An advanced course providing the student with a thorough understanding of the biblical and modern history of Israel, its surrounding region, and the role geography played in these events. Particular attention is placed on locations mentioned in the biblical stories. Students survey the vast literature on this subject, and then travel throughout Israel for the purpose of enhancing their understanding gained in the classroom. (The student is expected to bear the costs of the study trip to Israel.)

JMS 510 HISTORY OF THE JEWISH PEOPLE

An advanced course tracing the history of Jewish believers in Jesus from the first century to the present against the background of Jewish history in general. Attention is given to the most significant individuals and events that have shaped Jewish history, as well as methods that have been used in missions to the Jews.

JMS 521 JEWISH INTERCULTURAL COMMUNICATION

An advanced course designed for students interested in evangelistic ministry focusing on cross-cultural encounters with Jewish people. Acquiring a better understanding of American Jewry and Jewish evangelism. Students employ an anthropological approach to identify features of Jewish ethnic identity and culture and become familiar with religious practices and traditions in Judaism along with the ideological beliefs of contemporary Jewry in the United States. These broad foundations are applied to strategic thinking about practice and theory in Jewish evangelism.

JMS 550 THEOLOGY OF ISRAEL

An advanced biblical-theological study of the subject of Israel and its practical application to ecclesiology (doctrine of the church) and missiology (doctrine of missions). This course critically evaluates Replacement Theology and Dual Covenant Theology in light of relevant biblical texts concerning

Israel’s past, present, and future with a special focus on a Pauline theology of Israel and its application for the church today.  

JMS 560 MESSIANIC PROPHECY

An advanced course that traces the development of messianic prophecy in the Old Testament as it relates to Israel and the nations and also shows its fulfillment in the person of Jesus, the Messiah of Israel. Attention given to Jewish interpretation of prophetic passages as expressed in Jewish literature.

JMS 600 FIELD ARCHAEOLOGY

An advanced course that includes a practical hands-on study and utilization of archaeological excavation techniques and procedures under the guidance of trained professionals. Excavation sites are chosen with reference to their relevance and importance to the field of biblical studies.

JMS 610 RABBINIC LITERATURE

An advanced course examining both the phenomenon and the essential texts of rabbinic literature. Attention given to the relevance of this literature to the New Testament and to the use of the Old Testament in the New. Students are introduced to Rashi, Rambam, and the mysticism of the Zohar.

JMS 620 JEWISH LIFE AND CULTURE

An advanced study of Jewish religious thought, sense of time, holidays, music, film, and modern literature. Emphasizing the historical, social, and cultural dynamics of the Jewish people. Students analyze and interact with Jewish music, film, and literature through listening, reading, writing, viewing, and class discussion.

JMS 670 TOPICS IN JEWISH STUDIES

An advanced in-depth analysis of a selected topic related to Jewish studies. Areas of concern are apologetics, Middle East conflict, and Holocaust. This course may be repeated for credit when the topic of study differs.

MIN 505 CHRISTIAN LEADERSHIP

An examination of distinctive principles of Christian leadership. Seeks to evaluate contemporary thought about leadership, assisting each student in achieving the most significant leadership skills possible. Attention is given to researching and developing a biblical philosophy of leadership and ministry.

MIN 625 TOPICS IN LEADERSHIP

A detailed study, with a significant research component, of a selected topic in Christian leadership. This course may be repeated for credit when the topic studied differs. Open to graduate students who are completing their final 18 hours of an M.A. degree (see Academic Advising and Curriculum Planning).

MIN 628 DOCTRINAL PREACHING

A concentrated study of the grounds and methodology of preaching doctrine to a contemporary audience. Attention is given to the construction and delivery of doctrinal sermons in an expositional fashion. An examination of great doctrinal sermons both ancient and modern. Students write and preach at least two doctrinal sermons in class.

MIN 630 KERYGMA: APOSTOLIC PREACHING IN ACTS

An advanced preaching course seeking to discover the authentic kerygma preached by the Apostles. Students critically read and examine the apostolic sermons in the book of Acts to determine their content and how the apostles effectively delivered sermons and called people to Christ. Each student prepares a sermon based on the apostolic model. (Prerequisite: MIN 701)

MIN 631 PREACHING FROM THE OLD TESTAMENT

An advanced Old Testament preaching course. The use of Hebrew exegetical tools and the application of the elementary principles of Hebrew exegesis to a selected passage from the Old Testament for the purpose of preparing an expository sermon. Integrates previous studies in hermeneutics, language, theology, and homiletics in preparing a biblical passage for exposition. (Prerequisite: HEB 602, MIN 701 recommended)

MIN 633 PREACHING FROM THE NEW TESTAMENT

An advanced New Testament preaching course. The use of Greek exegetical tools and the application of the elementary principles of Greek exegesis to a selected passage from the New Testament for the purpose of preparing an expository sermon. Integrates previous studies in hermeneutics, language, theology, and homiletics in preparing a biblical book for exposition. (Prerequisite: GRK 502, MIN 701 recommended)

MIN 635 EVANGELISTIC PREACHING

An advanced study of oratory and rhetoric as they relate to evangelistic preaching. Students learn to prepare expository, textual, and topical evangelistic sermons. Particular emphasis is placed on delivering an effective evangelistic invitation. (Prerequisites: EMS 501, MIN 701, MIN 702)

MIN 651 HISTORY AND THEOLOGY OF PREACHING

An extensive historical examination of preaching beginning with the Apostles and moving through the modern era, focusing on key biblical texts that delineate the theological foundation for the preaching event.

MIN 655 THE PREACHING OF SPURGEON AND CRISWELL

Students trace the preaching ministries of Charles Haddon Spurgeon and W. A. Criswell from their youths to the height of their popularity, comparing and contrasting their preaching styles, sermonic content, passion, use of illustrations, and delivery, among other factors, to discover and integrate transferable principles which can be adopted by the contemporary pulpiteer. (Prerequisite: MIN 701)

MIN 701 PREPARATION OF EXPOSITORY SERMONS

An advanced study of the basic principles of sermon preparation. Attention is given to the formulation of a biblical philosophy of preaching and to sermon organization that facilitates expository messages which are biblical and relevant. Both the formal and functional elements of the sermon are explored. (Prerequisites: GRK 502 or equivalent; HEB 602 or equivalent)

MIN 702 DELIVERY OF EXPOSITORY SERMONS

A continuing advanced study of basic types of sermon delivery, with emphasis placed on preaching without notes. (Prerequisite: MIN 701)

MIN 703 PASTORAL LEADERSHIP

An exhaustive examination of the role and work of the pastor. Attention is devoted to the nature of the pastor’s role and to the discharge of pastoral responsibilities. Emphasis is placed on the role of the pastor as counselor, teacher, comforter, administrator, and intercessor. Principles of personal time management, interpersonal skills, leadership, and motivation are examined.

MIN 710 TOPICS IN MINISTRY

A detailed study, with a significant research component, of a selected topic in preaching, pastoral ministry, leadership, Christian education, or worship leadership. This course may be repeated for credit when the topic studied differs.

MIN 715 MINISTRY PRACTICUM

Supervised on-the-job training in the various aspects of ministry by an approved field education supervisor with set standards of performance and accountability required by both the ministry and the College. This course is open to graduate students nearing completion of the Master of Arts or Master of Divinity degrees.

NTS 501 NEW TESTAMENT INTRODUCTION I

An advanced study of the books of Matthew through Acts, emphasizing problems of interpretation and the contribution of these books to biblical theology and godly Christian living.

NTS 503 NEW TESTAMENT INTRODUCTION

An advanced one-semester introduction to the New Testament for M.A.C.L. students.

NTS 510 NEW TESTAMENT INTENSIVE

An advanced examination of selected books in the English Bible. This course may be repeated for credit when the book studied differs.

NTS 550 NEW TESTAMENT BACKGROUNDS

An advanced study of the Jewish and Greco-Roman historical, social, and literary contexts of the New Testament. (Prerequisites: NTS 501, NTS 601, OTS 501, OTS 601)

NTS 601 NEW TESTAMENT INTRODUCTION II

An advanced study of the books of Romans through Revelation, emphasizing problems of interpretation and the contribution of these books to biblical theology and godly Christian living.

NTS 602 NEW TESTAMENT THEOLOGY

A study of the principal religious themes of the New Testament from the perspective afforded exegetical studies of the Greek text. Recognizes diversity in the New Testament, and suggests methodological resolutions to the issue of unity within diversity, including definitions; the history of biblical theology; the relationship of New Testament theology to other disciplines; the relationship between history, revelation, and kerygma; biblical authority; and the hermeneutical question.

NTS 715 TOPICS IN NEW TESTAMENT STUDIES

A concentrated study of selected topics and exegesis of selected passages relevant to New Testament studies. Methodologically, the courses offered are exegetical, yet integrating other related disciplines such as exposition, hermeneutics, theology, ethics, discipleship, leadership, etc.

OTS 501 OLD TESTAMENT INTRODUCTION I

An advanced study of the books of Genesis through Esther, emphasizing the historical framework of the Old Testament, problems of interpretation, and the contribution of these books to biblical theology and godly living.

OTS 503 OLD TESTAMENT INTRODUCTION

An advanced one-semester introduction to the Old Testament for M.A.C.L. students.

OTS 510 OLD TESTAMENT INTENSIVE

An advanced intensive study of selected books in the English Bible. Course offerings are scheduled each semester. This course may be repeated for credit when the book studied differs.

OTS 550 OLD TESTAMENT BACKGROUNDS

An advanced intensive study of the historical, social, and literary contexts of the Old Testament. (Prerequisites: OTS 501, OTS 601)  

OTS 601 OLD TESTAMENT INTRODUCTION II

An advanced study of the books of Job through Malachi, emphasizing the historical framework of the Old Testament, problems of interpretation, and the contribution of these books to biblical theology and godly living.

OTS 602 OLD TESTAMENT THEOLOGY

A study of the principal religious themes of the Old Testament from the perspective afforded by exegetical studies of the Hebrew text. While the course includes a historical introduction to the discipline of Old Testament theology, focus is on delineating the distinctive elements of Hebrew thought and their contributions to the shape of biblical revelation.

OTS 715 TOPICS IN OLD TESTAMENT STUDIES

A concentrated study of selected topics and exegesis of selected passages relevant to Old Testament studies. Methodologically, the courses offered are exegetical, yet integrating other related disciplines such as exposition, hermeneutics, theology, ethics, discipleship, and leadership.

PHI 502 PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION

An advanced study of historical and contemporary worldviews and philosophical issues relevant to Christian ministry, such as religious pluralism, the problem of evil, and the relationship between faith and reason.

PHI 503 FAITH AND REASON

An exploration of the issues related to faith and reason. The question of antithesis, whether or not faith and reason are mutually exclusive, or synthesis, whether or not faith seeking understanding is viable, are discussed, and a biblical model of synthesis is established.

PHI 505 PHILOSOPHICAL HERMENEUTICS

A philosophical study of historical and contemporary approaches and theories of hermeneutics, with special attention to their impact on biblical interpretation.

PHI 515 INTRODUCTION TO LOGIC

A general introduction to logic covering both deductive and inductive inference and the analysis of arguments in ordinary language.

PHI 520 PHILOSOPHY OF LANGUAGE

A study of the nature and use of language in general and specifically its ability to communicate religious truth and experience. Key thinkers representing major historical time periods (including the contemporary) and supposed problems for Christian theology are examined. Important questions include how temporal language is used to discuss the eternal God.

PHI 530 MIND AND BODY

A study in ontological and anthropological issues of what properly connotes being in general, and in particular, human being. Issues such as the Image of God, the relation of the body to the soul, and the eternal aspects of life after death are discussed.

PHI 540 MORAL PHILOSOPHY

An examination of the views of prominent philosophers regarding the moral life and the nature of morality. Emphasis is placed on what it means for humans to be moral beings, both as individuals and in community, covering aspects of political philosophy, and on the proper grounds and ultimate end of the moral life.

PHI 601 TOPICS IN PHILOSOPHY

A thorough examination of a subject within the discipline of philosophy. A particular philosopher or school of philosophy may be the chosen subject, or a philosophical question may be selected. The relevance of the subject for Christian theism are discussed. This course may be repeated for credit when the topic of study differs.

RES 601 LIBRARY RESEARCH SEMINAR Non-credit Course

Required for all incoming graduate students, this one hour seminar includes the use of a theological library and preparation of a research paper according to the standards of the current Criswell College Manual of Style. Must be completed in the first nine hours of graduate studies. Offered two times at the beginning of each semester with several assignments due over a five week period.

RES 602 THESIS SEMINAR

A study of strategies and resources for research and technical writing in the field of theology and biblical studies. Includes advanced instruction in the use of a theological library and preparation of a graduate level research paper or thesis proposal according to the standards of the current Criswell College Manual of Style. Course offered by request only.

RES 603 M.A. THESIS

With the permission of the Academic Cabinet and an appointed thesis committee, Master of Arts students may submit a thesis of 60 to 80 typewritten pages. Three semester hours credit will be given upon the approval of the completed thesis. Suitable topics must be approved by the thesis committee and the Academic Cabinet. A prospectus of the proposed research project should be submitted to the Academic Cabinet for approval by the completion of RES 602. Guidelines for prospectus and thesis writing may be secured from the Vice President of Academic Affairs or are presented in RES 602.

Students must register for this course in the semester following the approval of the prospectus. (Prerequisite: RES 602)

THS 504 SPIRITUAL FOUNDATIONS

An advanced study of the basic convictions and disciplines of the life of the Christian, showing the relationship between beliefs and practice, with special attention given to the Christian family and to principles of importance for Christian leaders.

THS 510 SYSTEMATIC THEOLOGY I

An advanced study of Prolegomena, Bibliology, Theology Proper, Creation, and Angelology, defining the scriptural views and showing the arguments for them, refuting other views, and showing the relevance of this theology to Christian life and witness. (Prerequisites: NTS and OTS Introduction courses per degree program requirements, PHI 505 Philosophical Hermeneutics)

THS 515 SYSTEMATIC THEOLOGY II

An advanced study of Anthropology, Hamartiology, Christology (work of Christ), and Pneumatology, defining the scriptural views and showing the arguments for them, refuting other views, and showing the relevance of this theology to Christian life and witness. (Prerequisites: NTS and OTS Introduction courses per degree program requirements, PHI 505 Philosophical Hermeneutics, and THS 510 Systematic Theology I)

THS 520 SYSTEMATIC THEOLOGY III

An advanced study of Soteriology, Ecclesiology, and Eschatology, defining the scriptural views and showing the arguments for them, refuting other views, and showing the relevance of this theology to Christian life and witness. This course stresses the Baptist view of the church and of the ordinances, as well as broader Baptist polity, and the various eschatological perspectives. (Prerequisites: NTS and OTS Introduction courses per degree program requirements, PHI 505 Philosophical Hermeneutics, and THS 510 Systematic Theology I)

THS 550 THEOLOGY INTENSIVE

An intensive advanced study of a selected doctrine of systematic theology, a selected period of historical theology, or a selected issue in relation to theology. This course may be repeated for credit when the specific doctrine or historical period differs.

THS 603 CHURCH HISTORY

An advanced examination of the history of the Christian church from the first century to the present, with emphasis on the roots of American Christianity.

THS 604 BAPTIST HISTORY AND DISTINCTIVES

An advanced study of the Anabaptists and their origins is followed by an examination of the emergence of the English Baptists and their subsequent history. A discussion of the history of Baptists in the U.S. emphasizing Southern Baptists. Stress is placed on the distinctive beliefs of Baptists within the context of the broader reformation heritage.

THS 610 THEOLOGY OF LEADERSHIP

An advanced spiritual formation study of the theological aspects of leadership, including relevant material from the Old and New Testaments reflecting biblical perspectives on God’s call to leadership, how to become, and what it means to be, a godly servant-leader particularly in the home, church, and public settings, as well as anticipated hindrances to the development and exercising of such biblically appropriate leadership. (Prerequisite: THS 504)

THS 615 PATRISTIC AND MEDIEVAL THEOLOGY

A survey of the development of Christian Theology from the end of the Apostolic Period (A.D. 100) to the beginning of the Reformation Period (A.D. 1500). Special emphasis is placed on the historical and theological movements and the theologians of the period.

THS 620 THEOLOGY OF MOVIES & VISUAL MEDIA

A focused theological study of movies and other visual media. An overview of both Old and New Testament teaching on “the image” as well as the historic relationship between Christianity and the arts. Students are equipped to think “Christianly” about movies and visual communication, which includes watching and critiquing movies and other visual media to preset the gospel.

THS 635 PROLEGOMENA AND THEOLOGICAL METHOD

A seminar discussing the background and rationale for primary theological terminology and the varied methodology employed to develop, and models used to convey understandably, major historical and contemporary systems of theology. The student is expected to work through key issues of personal theological method.

THS 650 REFORMATION AND POST-REFORMATION THEOLOGY

An examination of the views and influence of the magisterial Reformers and the Anabaptists and their significant theological heirs and opponents until the end of the eighteenth century. Special focus is given to the continuing influence of these groups and their views on contemporary evangelicalism.

THS 665 MODERN AND POSTMODERN THEOLOGY

An examination of the development of major theological perspectives from A.D. 1800 to the present time. Attention is given to modernist and postmodernist liberal theology in their major forms as well as major developments within evangelical theology, including varied reactions to the changing theological landscape.